My Newest Book

It may be purchased now at Amazon or Wipf and Stock Publisher. It will be available at Amazon and other internet stores in a few days.

“Does God Love All or Some?” includes thirty-four chapters that address Calvinist arguments such as libertarian freedom undermines God’s sovereignty, rejecting Calvinism requires a weak view of depravity, what about those who never hear the gospel? I show how we know God’s salvific love is Extensive, extends to every person, rather than limited to Calvinism’s exclusive group, the unconditionally elected. I establish how we know God gives every person an opportunity to be saved, and how human acts like prayer really can affect a person’s salvation, something which true Calvinism precludes.

I demonstrate true Calvinism is internally and biblically inconsistent by exploring such things as how the good faith offer is a really a bad deception, God is inescapably the ultimate cause of all sin, Calvinism’s commitment to compatible moral freedom means every prayer, act, or proclamation that even hints at being able to change outcomes or involve a choice between accessible options contradicts true Calvinism, faith does not precede regeneration in Scripture and the analogy of human death cannot be used to demonstrate it does, reprobation is not necessary to demonstrate God’s holiness, God does not have two wills, and the doctrines of grace do seriously affect evangelism.

Endorsements

“From the pen of a seasoned pastor and thoughtful former Calvinist—this book peels back the layers of obfuscation that often encrust the hard re­alities of what is entailed in Calvinistic theology. This is probably the most penetrating summary critique of the biblical, theological, logical, and prac­tical incongruences inherent in Calvinistic theology I have read. Rogers goes beyond the surface level of criticism to the deeper layers of contradic­tions, exposing the soft underbelly of much of Reformed theology. Irenic, respectful, yet thoroughly probing, this is a must read for all who want to understand the issues more deeply.”

David L. Allen
Dean, School of Preaching, Distinguished Professor of Preaching
Director of the Southwestern Center for Expository Preaching and George W. Truett Chair of Ministry, Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary

“Does God Love All or Some?” should be required reading for all students preparing for ministry. Ronnie Rogers covers an array of topics that, unfor­tunately, are all-too-often neglected in theological education and personal conversations. From persuasively correcting the mythical narrative that one must be either an Arminian or a Calvinist to tackling the illogical fallacy of compatibilism, the author, with wit and balance, shares his personal theo­logical journey and works through the maze of biblical complexities. I wish such a volume was available when I attended seminary years ago.”

Emir Caner
President, Truett McConnell University, Professor of History and Christian Studies

“I highly recommend this latest work by Ronnie Rogers to you….His treatment of the extensive nature of the atonement also deserves attention because he has written it as a person formerly ensconced in the doctrines of grace. His familiarity with the issues relevant to those who really are trying to work their way through Scripture, theology, and ministry is apparent in individual chapters dealing with so many of the nu­ances involved in addressing the question.

Barry Creamer
President, Criswell College, Professor of Humanities

From the Foreword

Rogers’ work reflects careful thought, precise language, and a gentle tone. He appeals to those who affirm Calvinistic theology to consider whether their presuppositions and definitions provide clarity to their reading of Scripture or reinforce their theological framework into which they place and through which they interpret Scripture. From this position of theological inquiry, Rogers deftly probes key issues such as the nature of God, providence, the human condition, compatibilism, God’s desire for lost humanity, the order of salvation, grace, the gospel, and the dilemmas faced by Calvinists and Extensivists. Readers who desire to examine the distinctions between Christianity with Calvinism and Christianity without Calvinism will find this book to be a storehouse of perceptive theological inquiry and faithful exegetical analysis.

Adam Harwood, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Theology, McFarland Chair of Theology, Director of the Baptist Center for Theology & Ministry, Editor of the Journal for Baptist Theology & Ministry
New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary

Faith Precedes Regeneration and Revelation Precedes Faith

Salvation begins with God revealing himself to man. Man cannot find God unless he reveals himself to man. God’s love for his creation is why there is a way for people to be saved from their just desert (John 3:16). Christ came into the world to save mankind, which means he had to pay for man’s sins (John 1:29). He also had to initiate the salvation opportunity on a personal level since man on his own will never pursue God (Rom 3:11). He did this by enlightening every person (John 1:9–13) and by drawing and calling individuals to salvation (John 6:44; 12:32) so that a person can by grace, trust in the person and work of Christ, which is the will and work of God (John 6:29).

It is after God reveals himself and enables mankind to believe that he gives man the command and opportunity to believe, which man does not have to do (Matt 11:20–24). If man does respond in faith to the revelation of God, God will respond by creating a new person (2 Cor 5:17). The work of regeneration is totally a work of God, as was the first creation. The order of salvation is revelation, faith, and regeneration. Continue reading →

Dr. Paige Patterson Falsely Accused, Again

Since Jennifer Lyell misrepresented Dr. Paige Patterson, as the Houston Chronicle article did, in the unveiling of her consensual sexual encounter, I thought I would post his letter to the Chronicle.

February 14, 2019

Mr. Steve Riley
Acting Editor
The Houston Chronicle
4747 Southwest Freeway
Houston, Texas 77027

Dear Mr. Editor:

For 42 years, I have said to each graduating class, “If you have not settled forever the issue of sexual purity, take your diploma tomorrow and leave church ministry altogether.”  I feel compelled to respond to the Houston Chronicle article in which I was cited.  In the case of Darrell Gilyard, Dr. Keith Eitel (now a dean at Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary) and Dr. Danny Akin (now president at Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary) worked directly with me to uncover and confirm Darrell’s unfaithfulness to Christ. Dr. Keith Eitel has film of the proceedings of Gilyard’s discipline at the Criswell College, and Gilyard was consequently expelled from school.  Dr. Akin accompanied me to Gilyard’s church to be certain that he resigned.  I called as many places as I knew where he was scheduled to preach and asked them to cancel his invitation.  Most did cancel, and he no longer speaks in Southern Baptist churches.

Further, letters exist in my file from the young woman at Southeastern thanking me for the way in which her situation was handled.  She now (more than a decade later) claims to have been raped.  According to Dr. Akin as quoted in a Baptist Press article, the term “rape” was not found in the report in her official student file, and there are no details of information being given to me or of my involvement in the matter.  Dr. Akin did confirm that my vice presidents had handled the matter properly as this was during the transition of my presidency to Southwestern.

Fort Worth Police records show that within seconds of receiving an allegation of rape at Southwestern by a female student wit h her mother present, I called the police.  They arrived in less than twenty minutes.  The young man – also a student – was immediately dismissed from the school.  The young woman was asked by me to file charges against him, and she refused.  The Southwestern trustees even confirmed in a public statement, “evidence exists that Dr. Patterson has complied with reporting laws regarding assault and abuse.”

Houston Chronicle reporters have slandered and totally misrepresented me, and in so doing have significantly harmed my ministry.  The events they report are tragic.  However, there is no reason to punish the innocent with the wicked. I applaud SBC president Dr. J.D. Greear for doing all that he can to bring this abrogation of righteousness and justice to a halt.  Anyone abusing a child, a woman, or any weaker person is wrong and marked by deviant behavior.  Anyone claiming to be a follower of Christ who acts in such a way or who protects one who preys upon another is both opprobrious and ignoble.  Anyone claiming to be a minister of the Gospel who is thus involved is reprehensible and should not continue in the ministry.

The facts are available to anyone who wishes to know the truth.  A good investigative reporter should study existing evidence to identify and bring to justice those who are guilty, being careful not to accuse one who has been completely cleared of the charges alleged.

Until He comes,

 

 

Paige Patterson
Dallas, Texas

CC: Mr. Shelby Sharpe, Attorney at Law

 

The Five Reasons for Church Discipline

I have led churches to practice church discipline for over thirty years now, and I do not see the need for church discipline to be any less today than in years past. If anything, the need has increased.

Church discipline can be understood as the biblical attitude and actions of the local church that enable her to preserve her submission to the head of the church in holiness, fellowship, testimony, mission, and doctrinal purity, with the purpose of maintaining a conducive atmosphere for following Christ and experiencing His presence and power. Church discipline includes the following purposes: redemption, correction, protection, purification, and justice. On a practical level, I would further distinguish between non-formal and formal discipline. Non-formal includes all aspects of the biblical teaching and practical application of church discipline up to public involvement of the full church body in either seeking repentance of the sinning brother or sister or removal from fellowship. Continue reading →

Church Discipline Requires a Tender Heart – Love Not Legalism

A biblical attitude is crucial to the whole process of church discipline. If the attitude of those implementing discipline is not right, then what God designed to be a beautiful act of selfless love is transformed into an ugly act of power, even if all the other instructions are followed to the letter. The offspring of that evil may shortly surface as a disuniting and judgmental spirit in the fellowship, or it may lay dormant until the next attempt to lead the church in discipline and then surface with a vengeance.[1] Continue reading →

The Right and Wrong of the Houston Chronicle’s Articles on “Abuse of Faith”

The Houston Chronicle helped in that it shed light on some abuses that were not taken seriously enough, hidden or ignored. These abuses are immeasurably tragic and trivializing of them is the tragedy of tragedies. I regret cover-ups of any human tragedies by churches, Christians, and leaders. I regret when churches fail to follow the biblical teaching on church discipline because it results in the sacrifice of righteousness and mercy toward the guilty and victims and because it results in the world having to expose such grievous sins in the church (Mt 18:15-20; Rm 16:17-18; 1 Co 5:1-13; Gal 6:1-2; 2 Thes 3:6-13). Consequently, sin in the church is not the actual travesty since we are all sinners. Rather, it is the church’s failure to follow Christ’s teaching for addressing it that is the epic failure. Continue reading →

Was Paige Patterson Presumed Guilty?

By Ron F. Hale

Who but Winston Churchill possessed the gall and grit to stare down the unified armed forces of Nazi Germany while inspiring his countrymen to endure their greatest struggle and suffering? Yet, after fighting Nazi forces on the beaches, in the air, on the seas and oceans, in the fields and in the streets, the war-weary British immediately set Churchill aside in the 1945 post-war landslide election. It was not the “finest hour” of this great statesman and war hero. Consoling her husband, Mrs. Churchill said, “It may well be a blessing in disguise.” Churchill’s witty comeback was: “At the moment it seems quite effectively disguised.” Continue reading →

Sanctioned Illegal Immigration is an Illegal Uncompassionate Mobocracy

Actively or passively facilitating or incentivizing illegal immigration only appears to be compassionate. In the long term, it is actually uncompassionate because it undermines legal immigration and fuels globalism, which deconstructs the USA as a sovereign nation, creates and perpetuates unnecessary border crises of suffering, promotes lawlessness, and it costs more to fund than securing the border and supporting only legal immigration.[1] Ultimately such misdirected compassion changes the culture of the USA into the very culture illegal immigrants left, an impoverished dictatorship or mobocracy, which benefits no one. Continue reading →

This New Year and Every Day I Ask God to…

Grant that I would confess unguardedly to You since You know my sin more fully than it shall ever be known by me (1 John 1:9).

Grant that I shall confess unhesitatingly and not suffer the loss of one moment of fellowship with You (1 Cor 1:9).

Grant that repentance would be seen as my ever-present friend that carries me back to you and not a distant stranger (Rom 2:4).

Grant that I think about dying to self a hundred times more than I think of living (1 Cor 15:31).

Grant that I pursue and choose humility like my Lord Jesus (Phil 2:8).

Grant that I decreasingly have to be humbled to conform me to Christ (Matt 26:75).

Grant that I cherish obscurity more than prominence (John 3:30).

Grant that my awareness of what you give me is never overshadowed by any sense of lack (Eph 1:3).

Grant that any sense of self-pity, lack, loss, or despondency would be conquered by gratefulness for not receiving what I deserve and receiving your blessings that I do not deserve (Eph 2:1-4).

Grant that I would daily live to influence people toward eternity with You (John 1:7).

Grant that sharing things with others would continually bridle the passion of my flesh to accumulate things for me (Matt 6:4).

Grant that sharing with others is more important to me than maintaining an inordinate sufficiency for me (Eph 4:28).

Grant that, come what may, I never fall out of love with You and Your Word (Rev 2:4).

Thank you, Lord!