Understanding the Terms of Cultural Marxism (Social Justice): A Christian response

Critical Race Theory (CRT)[1] defines race as being socially constructed rather than a natural biological function.[2] In CRT, the concept of race was constructed by white people and serves as a mechanism for them to oppress black people and promote pervasive institutional racism in order to maintain white supremacy.

CRT is related to Cultural Marxism which is composed of a broad set of ideas that serve as instruments for a societal transformation to bring about the redistribution of power and wealth–Socialism.[3] White people need to repent of white supremacy and privilege, but black people do not need to repent. Even if a white person has never had a genuinely racist thought or he has repented of past racism, he is still a racist, white supremacist, because he is white and belongs to the majority.[4] Continue reading →

Resources for Christians Thinking through Social Justice Issues

These articles, messages, and links are provided to help Christians remain faithful to the Scripture in our actions, heart, and speech at a time when many evangelical leaders are abandoning clear biblical teaching. Or they are unjustifiably mixing biblical teaching with cultural Marxism, social justice, critical race theory, intersectionality, and terminology from Black Lives Matters (BLM), all of which are inferior to the biblical message and tacitly minimize the ungodly beliefs of BLM. In either case, the biblical perspective and the gospel is corrupted.

In their allegiances, they undermine Scripture by confusing such things as social justice with biblical justice, critical race theory’s definition of race and racism with Scripture’s teaching on race and racism, social justice’s evil privilege with biblical blessings, cultural Marxism’s white supremacy and guilt based on skin color and its ineffective repentance with God’s standard, which is that any sinful racial supremacy flows from the heart, but it can be forgiven and all guilt removed by repentance and faith.

 Every attempt to speak about racism that does not pedestal “all are created in the image of God” (Gen 1:26–28) or adopts inferior cultural expressions undermines the clarity of the Christian message and the gospel. Continue reading →

Trouble in the SBC: Some Helpful Links

I have written and spoken about the many fruits that still exist from God’s Conservative Resurgence which restored the primacy of the inerrant Scripture in and throughout all of our Southern Baptist entities. I have also written and spoken in a series In Defense of  God’s Order and the Gospel about the present peddling of destructive ideas such as social justice, Critical Race Theory, Intersectionality, feminism, women preachers and prophetesses in the local church, Me Too excessive right by might, reducing biblical complementarianism to soft complementarianism (or one could say soft egalitarianism) and obscuring the unambiguous message and language regarding homosexuality and gender fluidity. Continue reading →

I am Troubled About an ERLC Article on Abortion

Phoebe Cates wrote an article that is posted on the ERLC website entitled, “Why our hearts matter when talking about Abortion.”

I agree with the title of the article. We should have a broken heart over the tragedy of every abortion and a tender heart toward every person who needs Christ. We should approach the woman who is contemplating abortion or has had one with love, truth, and gentleness (Eph 4:15; 1 Pet 3:15). I appreciate Phoebe reminding us of the importance of our heart when we engage women who struggle with or have had an abortion. Continue reading →

The Undermining of Truth: The Danger of Unguarded Reliance Upon Science and Statistics

In the quest to seem with it in our present scientistic milieu, preachers and Christians often pursue fluency regarding the latest polls, statistics, and studies (punctiliar thinking) more than they seek understanding of the Scripture and linear thinking. This quest is often characterized by indiscriminate reliance upon and usage of these tools, which actually leads people further from the truth both in their thinking processes and in their conclusions. Although these tools are useful at times, they should be used judiciously and sparingly lest one unwittingly becomes a scientistic myrmidon, and by his example leads others to do likewise. Continue reading →

Sanctioned Illegal Immigration is an Illegal Uncompassionate Mobocracy

Actively or passively facilitating or incentivizing illegal immigration only appears to be compassionate. In the long term, it is actually uncompassionate because it undermines legal immigration and fuels globalism, which deconstructs the USA as a sovereign nation, creates and perpetuates unnecessary border crises of suffering, promotes lawlessness, and it costs more to fund than securing the border and supporting only legal immigration.[1] Ultimately such misdirected compassion changes the culture of the USA into the very culture illegal immigrants left, an impoverished dictatorship or mobocracy, which benefits no one. Continue reading →

Clearing Up Some Ethical Confusion

Ethical decisions are a part of everyday life, and it is incumbent upon Christians to make moral and ethical decisions based upon the teaching of Scripture.  Some of these decisions seem very easy; for example, murder, lying, and stealing are wrong, and truth-telling, mercy, and sacrifice are good. As clear as those seem to be, real-life experiences, recorded in the Scripture or lived out today, can create some nuances that becloud the issue.

For example, confusion can arise when a certain act that is condemned in Scripture has features similar to other acts that are not condemned and because of the similar features between that which is condemned and that which is not, the two acts are unjustifiably equated as being the same.  An example of this would be the difference in being a martyr and committing suicide.

In The Round Table in Ethics, I have noticed a few things that tend to create confusion for Christians trying to understand and apply biblical ethics.  This primarily revolves around making similar acts identical or equating God’s commendation of some elements of an event with God’s implied approval of all the elements of the event even when those elements are without exception said to be sin everywhere they are explicitly mentioned in Scripture.  An example of this would be lying.

Consequently, in the second week of my Round Table in Ethics, I present something I call “Ethical Considerations and Clarifications”.  In this presentation, I seek to address some distinctions that can be helpful in avoiding ethical dilemmas.  The issues addressed in this paper do not address every relevant issue, but only those that seem to present problems when considering various ethical issues in The Round Table. I address the relationship of similarities and dissimilarities, the difference between intrinsically good or evil acts and extrinsically good or evil acts, the Is-Ought fallacy, the Sin of Omission, arguments from silence, and then I explain what a lie is. Continue reading →