The Gospel Destroys Racism

A friend of mine ministers to inmates in a state prison. He recently shared this story an inmate shared with him. The man was in prison a few years ago, and while there, he belonged to a white supremacist gang. He was released from prison but then committed another crime. This time, he was sent to the prison where my friend ministers.

In the fall of 2019, my friend led the inmate to Christ and has been discipling him ever since. Soon after he was saved, the white supremacist gang at this prison saw his tattoo from his former life in a white supremacist gang. They sought to recruit him to help beat up a black inmate. He refused and told them he is now a follower of Jesus Christ. The white supremacists beat him so severely that he spent over a month in the hospital. But he did not compromise, and he is still being discipled and following Christ.

Although he still bears the physical tattooed markings of being a white supremacist, he has become a new creation, he has walked away from his old life, and his sins have been washed away. He has a new heart (John 3:3; 2 Cor 5:17).

“Come now, and let us reason together,” says the Lord, “Though your sins are as scarlet, they will be as white as snow; though they are red like crimson, they will be like wool” (Isa 1:18).

The gospel is the great reconciler.

Celebrate Thanksgiving with Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving, quite contrary to political correctness and revisionist historians, began as an act of faith and worship by the Pilgrims.

The first Thanksgiving was held in the autumn of 1621 in Plymouth, and it was a celebration of God’s bountiful blessing, which the Pilgrims shared with the Indians.

The Pilgrims’ lives had been characterized by religious persecution and loss of almost all worldly possessions. Many had died during the grueling voyage to the new land, and those that survived faced many more hardships that are so dramatically more treacherous than the difficulties faced by Americans today that we cannot quite grasp the gravity of it except romantically.

Yet, with bountiful food and the freedom to worship God, they gave thanks many times each day, but on this day in a most festive and worshipful way.

Let us not forget: Thanksgiving is an act of worship by God’s people. It is our thankfulness to Him for what He has done and does. Thus, from the vantage point of heaven, complaining must be a most sacrilegious act of self-absorption.

This Thanksgiving, celebrate it as an act of faith and worship, fulfilling the will of God. “In everything give thanks; for this is God’s will for you in Christ Jesus.” (1 Thessalonians 5:18)

How to Walk in Forgiveness without Undermining the Gospel

As Christians, we are to forgive those who trespass against us (Matt 6:12; 18:22; Mark 11:25-­26). Frequently, Christians say they are seeking to be forgiving as God is by forgiving someone who sinned against them, regardless of whether the person repents or is even remorseful for his sin. They may say, well, I just love them and forgive them as God does. But the question is, is that forgiveness flowing from God’s love? Continue reading →

Resources for Christians Thinking through Social Justice Issues

These articles, messages, and links are provided to help Christians remain faithful to the Scripture in our actions, heart, and speech at a time when many evangelical leaders are abandoning clear biblical teaching. Or they are unjustifiably mixing biblical teaching with cultural Marxism, social justice, critical race theory, intersectionality, and terminology from Black Lives Matters (BLM), all of which are inferior to the biblical message and tacitly minimize the ungodly beliefs of BLM. In either case, the biblical perspective and the gospel is corrupted.

In their allegiances, they undermine Scripture by confusing such things as social justice with biblical justice, critical race theory’s definition of race and racism with Scripture’s teaching on race and racism, social justice’s evil privilege with biblical blessings, cultural Marxism’s white supremacy and guilt based on skin color and its ineffective repentance with God’s standard, which is that any sinful racial supremacy flows from the heart, but it can be forgiven and all guilt removed by repentance and faith.

Every attempt to speak about racism that does not pedestal “all are created in the image of God” (Gen 1:26-28) or adopts inferior cultural expressions undermines the clarity of the Christian message and the gospel. Continue reading →

Where is God’s Temple Today?

Do you not know that you are a temple of God and that the Spirit of God dwells in you? (1 Cor 3:16)

The church in the New Testament has replaced the sacred Old Testament temple. The New Testament says that Christ’s body is a temple (John 2:19-21), the universal church is a temple (Eph 2:20-21), the individual Christian’s body is a temple (1 Cor 6:19), and in this verse the local church is a temple of God. The you is plural in this passage, signifying the corporate local body of believers. Consequently, every local New Testament church is a temple of God. Continue reading →

Prepare For God to Use You, To the Max!

“like newborn babies, long for the pure milk of the word, so that by it you may grow in respect to salvation,” (1 Peter 2:2).

Our willingness to be equipped today will significantly shape how and how much God uses us in the future.

We begin our Christian lives as babes in Christ (1 Cor 3:1; Heb 5:13). God surely can and does use us even when we are baby Christians, but if we remain babes, fail to grow and mature as followers of Christ, then we limit what God may do with and through us. Just like our children, if they remain infants, they limit themselves.

This is not to say God will use us all the same, or even as much as another person. Rather that we will either limit or reach our full potential in what God wants to do with us as an individual by how willing we are to be equipped today for His purposes today and tomorrow. The comparison is not between how much God uses one individual compared to another, but how much God uses an individual compared to how much he would have used him if he humbly sought to become all God desires him to be.

“But to this one I will look, To him who is humble and contrite of spirit, and who trembles at My word.” (Isaiah 66:2).

The Scripture is replete with commands, encouragement, and teachings about the need to grow spiritually and that help us grow; there are no scriptures that extol perennial infancy.

We need not concern ourselves so much with how God is going to use us in the future. Instead, we must focus upon availing ourselves to the opportunities for spiritual growth and service that are before us in the present. Then, when God is ready, and we are ready, he will open new areas of influence and ministry; often in ways, we could have never imagined. Do not wait on the magic moment to serve or grow; seize the present moment to grow and serve in whatever way is available.

“but speaking the truth in love, we are to grow up in all aspects into Him who is the head, even Christ, from whom the whole body, being fitted and held together by what every joint supplies, according to the proper working of each individual part, causes the growth of the body for the building up of itself in love.” (Ephesians 4:15-16).

Dr. Patterson’s Counsel to Pray for My Enemies

Jesus said, “But I say to you, love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you,” (Matt 5:44). We all know this verse but actually doing this or even knowing someone who regularly prays for their enemies is quite another matter.

Several years ago I was experiencing one of the most difficult times of my ministry. Some people were causing great harm to the church I pastored. As the pastor, my hurt was deep. Most pastors know the pain that comes from watching people we love turn and begin to attack us and do things that harm or even destroy the flock. It can cause anger, bitterness, depression, and even cynicism in the heart of the most dedicated of shepherds.

As I was leaving a meeting during this time, Dr. Patterson approached me. I was not aware he knew of my painful situation. His words helped me immensely. Not by psychologizing my plight or a pep talk of clichés, but rather he spoke directly from the Scripture. How he advised me to handle this situation were some of the most difficult words I could have heard.

He told me to pray for my enemies. He encouraged me to get down on my knees and pray for them before our heavenly Father. He said God might work in their lives and bless them. He told me this was his practice. He said there is a level of intimacy with our Lord Jesus one experiences while on his knees praying for his enemies, persecutors, and those who want to destroy him, an intimacy that cannot be experienced without following Jesus and praying for the very ones who seek our destruction.

Though I well knew the Scripture Dr. Patterson was referencing, his admonition helped me see it more practically and personally. For I knew, as leader of the resurgence, Dr. Patterson had many enemies. I knew he personally felt the human emotions that come with even contemplating such an act, and how one must die to self to seriously enter into such communion with our Lord. Knowing he had done this many times helped me have the faith and humility I needed to pray for people who hated me, for those who hurt my family and the church I love.

I am so grateful for his counsel and example of praying for those who seek to destroy us. I have experienced this intimacy with Christ on many occasions, and I have counseled others to handle their detractors in the same manner. I desire to be faithful in praying for loved ones and those with whom I have fellowship, but none so much as those who seek to harm me. Even as I write this article, God has brought some to mind who have done me harm; thankfully, by only his grace, I prayed for them.

Jesus commanded us to pray for them, and he practiced what he taught when he prayed for the lost (John 17:21) and his enemies at the cross. “Father, forgive them; for they do not know what they are doing. And they cast lots, dividing up His garments among themselves.” (Luke 23:34).

May our Lord give you the strength to do the right thing in the right spirit. May he lead you to your knees to pray for the very ones who seek to hurt you, fire you, or malign your character. May you know Jesus in this dying-to-self-act. May this experience be repeated in your life and leave you forever changed as it has changed me.

The Practical Reasons for the Banishment of Church Discipline Answered

I have practiced church discipline for over thirty years, and here are some of the practical reasons often posed to me against the practice of church discipline.

It was abused in the past

When the subject of church discipline surfaces, someone will inevitably point to the abuses of the past as reason enough to squelch the whole conversation and move on to something more palatable. It is an undeniable fact that there have been abuses in the past. George Davis writes, “A perusal of old church minutes would tend to justify the claim that in the past church discipline was often wrongly motivated and sometimes concerned with petty matters.”[1] A classic example of abuse is when Pope Gregory VII (1073-1085) forced Henry IV to stand as a penitent in the snow outside the castle at Canossa begging the Pope to cancel his excommunication.[2] Continue reading →

Praying For God to be Exalted in My Life

“Be exalted above the heavens, O God; Let Your glory be above all the earth” (Psalm 57:5).

As Christians, we desire to see God glorified in our lives. We desire that others will want to follow God because of what they see in us. We want to be used of God. We do not want to live this life and come into his presence with only selfishness and pride.

Sometimes, we struggle with where to begin; by this I mean practically. The most practical thing we can do is to pray to that end. But, we often do not know what or how to pray.

Years ago, I read A.W. Tozer’s book, The Pursuit of God. At the end of each chapter he suggests a prayer to be prayed. The one at the end of chapter 8 had a profound impact upon my life. I prayed this prayer reverently and thoughtfully. I must admit, I found it to be a challenge that could only be sincerely met by trusting God. I pray God might use this in your life as well, as you pray and ponder each aspect of this prayer for your own life

“O God, be Thou exalted over my possessions. Nothing of earth’s treasures shall seem dear unto me if only Thou art glorified in my life. I am determined that Thou shalt be above all, though I must stand deserted and alone in the midst of the earth. Be Thou exalted above my comforts. Though it means the loss of bodily comforts and the carrying of heavy crosses, I shall keep my vow made this day before Thee.

Be Thou exalted over my reputation. Make me ambitious to please Thee even if as a result I must sink into obscurity and my name be forgotten as a dream. Rise, O Lord, into Thy proper place of honor, above my ambitions, above my likes and dislikes, above my family, my health and even my life itself. Let me sink that Thou mayest rise above. Ride forth upon me as Thou didst ride into Jerusalem mounted upon the humble little beast, a colt, the foal of an ass, and let me hear the children cry to Thee, ‘Hosanna in the highest.'”[1]


[1] A.W. Tozer, The Pursuit of God (Camp Hill, PA: Christian Publications, 1982) 99-100.

Beware of a Remote Love for Christ

A lack of, or a diminishing, passion for God’s Word is symptomatic of a remote love for God. Jesus said, “If you love Me, you will keep My commandments” (John 14:15). Yet, some Christians seem content to not only fail to keep Christ’s commandments but even to spend little time to know them.

If every architect knew as much about buildings as some Christians know about Christianity, no building could withstand a spring shower. If every lawman knew as much about law as some Christians know about Christianity, even the anarchist would long for a badge. If every sea captain knew as much about sailing the high seas as some Christians know about Christianity, every ship would be a floating mass grave. If every composer knew as much about music as some Christians know about Christianity, music would be so cacophonic it would be deemed cruel and unusual punishment. If every medical practitioner knew as much about medicine as some Christians know about Christianity, every disease would be treated with a prescription from a Mr. Potato Head game. If every educator knew as much about their subject as some Christians know about Christianity, kindergarten would be the terminal degree, and goo goo gaga would be our lingua franca.

May we say with the psalmist, “May Your lovingkindnesses also come to me, O Lord, Your salvation according to Your word; So I will have an answer for him who reproaches me, For I trust in Your word. And do not take the word of truth utterly out of my mouth, For I wait for Your ordinances. So I will keep Your law continually, Forever and ever. And I will walk at liberty, For I seek Your precepts. I will also speak of Your testimonies before kings And shall not be ashamed. I shall delight in Your commandments, Which I love. And I shall lift up my hands to Your commandments, Which I love; And I will meditate on Your statutes” (Psalm 119:41-48).