Clearing up some of the ethical confusion

Ethical decisions are a part of everyday life, and it is incumbent upon Christians to make moral and ethical decisions based upon the teaching of Scripture.  Some of these decisions seem very easy; for example, murder, lying, and stealing are wrong, and truth telling, mercy and sacrifice are good. As clear as those seem to be, real life experiences, recorded in the Scripture or lived out today, can create some nuances that becloud the issue. 

For example, confusion can arise when a certain act that is condemned in Scripture has features similar to other acts that are not condemned and because of the similar features between that which is condemned and that which is not, the two acts are unjustifiably equated as being the same.  An example of this would be the difference in being a martyr and committing suicide. 

In The Round Table in Ethics, I have noticed a few things that tend to create confusion for Christians trying to understand and apply biblical ethics.  This primarily revolves around making similar acts identical and/or equating God’s commendation of some elements of an event with God’s implied approval of all the elements of the event even when those elements are without exception said to be sin everywhere they are explicitly mentioned in Scripture.  An example of this would be lying. 

Consequently around the third week of Ethics, I present something I call “Ethical Considerations and Clarifications”.  In this presentation I seek to address some distinctions that can be helpful in avoiding ethical dilemmas.  The issues addressed in this paper do not address every relevant issue, but only those that seem to present problems when considering various ethical issues in The Round Table. I address the relationship of similarities and dissimilarities, the difference between intrinsically good or evil acts and extrinsically good or evil acts, the Is Ought fallacy, the Sin of Omission, arguments from silence, and then I explain what a lie is.  

Following is the link for the full paper:  Ethical Considerations.