An Apology to Dr. John Piper

The following is a copy of the letter that I sent to Dr. Piper regarding one of the quotes I used from him. I used the quote in a public way, and so in like manner is my apology.

Dear Dr. Piper,

My name is Ronnie W. Rogers, and I am writing to you in order to apologize and ask your forgiveness.

I most regretfully and inadvertently misrepresented a statement of yours in my book Reflections of a Disenchanted Calvinist. Please see quote at the close of this letter. Continue reading →

A Response to bloggers on SBC Today

As noted earlier, SBC Today published an interview with me regarding my book, Reflections of a Disenchanted Calvinist, as well as a four part series on my chapter entitled “The Lamb’s Book of Life: who’s in and who’s out?

As you can imagine, there were many responses. The editor of SBC Today has been kind enough to allow me to respond to several bloggers comments that I think need a word of clarification or correction.

The site indicates that my responses will be published Saturday July, 27 2012.

Go to sbctoday.com

Think About IT: When a Critique is NOT a Critique

Recently, James White, a very strong Calvinist presented what he packaged as a critique of Reflections of A Disenchanted Calvinist on his Radio program. He spent an hour “critiquing ” it. I was hopeful for a serious review from the Calvinist position, but I was disappointed.  I am grateful to Peter Lumpkins, who operates sbc tomorrow, for posting a critique of White’s critique. Below is the link to his  post yesterday.

http://peterlumpkins.typepad.com/peter_lumpkins/2012/07/james-white-critiques-ronnie-rogers-book-reflections-of-a-disenchanted-calvinist-by-peter-lumpkins.html

Reflections of a Disenchanted Calvinist: The Disquieting Realities of Calvinism

My latest book has finally reached the point of publication.  Although I do not think that reading the introduction of a book, including my other two, is critical to understand it, this book is an exception. To fully understand the format, terms used, and the spirit in which I wrote the book, it is essential to read the introduction.

“Reflections of a Disenchanted Calvinist: The Disquieting Realities of Calvinism engages one of the classical strands of Protestant thought with the classical strength of Protestantism—shedding the light of the Scriptures on the questions of the faith. This book leads readers through the intricacies of Calvinist thought, touching on such topics as the sovereignty of God, predestination, unconditional election, the origin of evil, free will, and faith and works. The intent of this journey is to provide a critique of Calvinism and to present readers with a clear picture of the ramifications of subscribing to Calvinist doctrines. Chapters address particular theological topics by stating both affirmations rooted in the Scriptures and disaffirmations drawing their support from the Scriptures as well. The lines of thought do not shy away from complex theological questions, but instead rely upon the riches of theological reflection to assure the critiques of Calvinism are fair both to the doctrines and to the Scriptures. If you are a part of the Calvinist tradition and want to explore the nuances of your background, or if you locate yourself outside of that tradition but have deep curiosity about the questions the Calvinist tradition raises, then Reflections of a Disenchanted Calvinist: The  Disquieting Realities of Calvinism offers a rigorous guide to exploring the depths of the tradition and critique of the tenets of Calvinism.”

Copies are available in hardback or paperback at Trinity Baptist Church or in hardback, paperback, and electronically at Amazon.com.